Our Horses

Our horses are the foundation team members of Envision programs.

Envision horses are specially chosen for their temperament, life experiences, soundness, conformation and movement as well as their desire and ability to be a dependable partner in their interactions with clients. Each horse receives extensive training to prepare them for their role in equine assisted therapeutic activities. Our trained volunteers know how to best assist and care for the horses so they can thrive in their roles as therapeutic partners. We are always looking for good and dependable horses for our programs.

Monte

Monte

Monte is owned by Chris Kirk, who generously allows us to work with this amazing horse. Monte Carlo is a Trakehner with a brilliant previous career in dressage and jumping. He is a beautiful mover with correct gaits and a caretaker temperament. Monte has many years of experience with therapeutic riding. He loves attention and gives great horse hugs.

Fully sponsored by his generous owner.

Lullaby

Lullaby

Lullaby, an Arabian, was born and bred in Oregon and came to Arizona in 1999. She is a 23 year old Chestnut mare about 14.3H. She was a former show and endurance horse and is used in both our equine assisted therapy and therapeutic riding programs. She is owned by the Bull Family who graciously allow us to work with this lovely horse.

Fully sponsored by her generous owner.

Rebel

Rebel

Rebel, a 30″ tall miniature horse,  was born in 1997.  At 197 pounds,  he is our little ambassador as he attends different venues to promote our program.  He is perfect for our participants who may at first be intimidated by the larger horses and is also nationally certified as a Pet Partner®, visiting nursing homes for animal assisted therapies.  Rebel has participated in two Tournament of Roses Parades, the Fiesta Bowl and Parada del Sol Parades in a driving miniature horse drill team. His story is also featured in “Chicken Soup for the Horse Lovers Soul II”.

Fully sponsored by his generous owner.

Bullet

Bullet

Bullet is owned by Chris Kirk, who generously allows us to work with this lovely horse. A buckskin quarterhorse, Bullet is well-mannered and a solid mount for riding.  His specialties for Envision are equine assisted learning and equine assisted psychotherapy.  His ability to read people and engage or disengage in response to their true emotional state is phenomenal.

Fully sponsored by his generous owner.

Sweet Kisses

Sweet Kisses

Sweet Kisses is a miniature pinto mare.  She is experienced with small children and 4H horsemanship.  Generously donated to Envision in 2015 at the age of 7, Kisses came with her stable buddy, Jewel.  Kisses is a certified Pet Partner® and works with children and seniors.

Sponsor Kisses with a monthly donation of $5, 10, 15, or 20 per month here. Kisses eats a little hay every day, has her hooves trimmed every 6 weeks, worming quarterly, vaccinations twice a year, a dental checkup once a year, and Pet Partner re-certification every other year. Her monthly support averages $300.00, and you can be one of her benefactors.

Tinker Toy

Tinker Toy

Tinker Toy is a miniature horse who is particularly fond of children.  The feeling is mutual.  Tink visits group homes for victims of abuse and trafficking, and is a certified Pet Partner®.

Fully sponsored by his generous owner.

Jewel

Jewel

Jewel is a female Nigerian Dwarf goat who came to Envision with Kisses at the age of two in the summer of 2015. She has been with Sweet Kisses since she was a baby being bottle fed.  Jewel loves to cuddle.  She has more playmates, two other Nigerian Dwarf goats, Butch and Sundance.

Fully sponsored by a generous supporter.

belle

Belle

Belle is a miniature donkey, graciously included in our program by owner Chris Kirk.  Belle just loves on people.  What a good job to have!  She is patient and sweet, and likes having her neck scratched on either side of her mane, that stands up like a Mohawk haircut.  Belle sometimes walks right underneath Monte to get to the other side of him.

Fully sponsored by her generous owner.

Lucy chestnut half arabian mare

Lucy

Lucy is a Registered Half Arabian mare. She is half Missouri Foxtrotter, which adds to her wonderful movement. Lucy’s registered name is Tiz Apotz Iz and she came to Envision in the summer of 2016 at the age of eight. Lucy is experienced in both equine facilitated learning and therapeutic riding, and grew up here in Arizona on wilderness trails.  Lucy has a huge heart and has a caretaker disposition.

Sponsor Lucy with a monthly donation of $5, 10, 15, or 20 per month here.  Lucy eats hay every day, has her hooves trimmed every 6 weeks, worming quarterly, vaccinations twice a year, and a dental checkup and wellness physical once a year. Her monthly support averages $400.00, and you can be one of her benefactors.

whiskey head shot

Shadow

This gentle black Quarterhorse has a white heart on his forehead, which tells you a lot about his generous personality.  Registered Docs Poco Driftwood, and foaled May 9, 2001 in Colorado, this gelding had a competitive career as a roping horse.  Shadow was in training to be a therapy horse for several months, and started participating in Envision sessions in January 0f 2017.

Sponsor Shadow with a monthly donation of $5, 10, 15, or 20 per month here.  Shadow eats hay every day, has his hooves trimmed every 6 weeks, worming quarterly, vaccinations twice a year, and a dental checkup and wellness physical once a year. His monthly support averages $400.00, and you can be one of his benefactors.

Rillo

Rillo  – In Memorium

girl with horse Prince at stall

Prince – In Memorium

Prince was owned by Chris Kirk, who generously allowed us to work with this gentlemanly horse. One of his best friends offered to share one of their moments with us. Prince’s ability and willingness to connect with people no matter their circumstances helped many clients.  We honor him, and thank Chris for sharing this special horse with us.  Prince crossed the rainbow bridge at the age of 41 this winter, and is sorely missed.

About Horses

Horses evolved as social grazers of the plains, group survivalists moving and grazing together most all of the time. During their 60-million-year evolution, horses came to require near-constant forage, friends and locomotion to maintain health.

In natural settings, horses walk and graze with other horses two thirds of the time. They take a step and graze, then another step or two grazing and moving along, always observing their surroundings, grazing while in touch with other members of the herd unless playing, occasionally dozing or sleeping, but only under the secure and established watch of others.  Horses are a quiet species. They prefer calm, and learn most efficiently in tranquil, familiar settings. Horses must know and be comfortable and secure in their environment to be able to learn. As to dominance, the science reveals that free-ranging horses form social hierarchies that are complex and rarely linear. Under natural open range conditions with adequate resources, horses seldom have the equivalent of an alpha individual because the roles of leadership and defense are more critical than domination.  Leadership is shared and alternated and variable and context dependent in established harems in natural settings. Dominance is not prevalent. When present, it facilitates group protection and stability.  Survival is herd based, rather than individual based. The lead mare leads the horses to water and grazing and resting places. She drinks first to make sure the water is safe. Horses seek competent leadership and are willing to accept competent leadership from humans.

As with people, strong social bonds develop between individual horses and groups of horses. This herd nature results in intense social pair and herd bonds. Horses need other horses. Horses require other horses for security, comfort, and behavioral health. Horses need friends throughout their entire life, first their teaching mother, and then their teaching herd. They are physiologically dependent on shared social grooming and sensual contact. Today’s domestic horse needs horse friends and human friends. Horses need friends so greatly and constantly, that horses allow humans to substitute as friends. This is possible because man shares a sociality with domestic horses. We speak their gesture language, and horses speak ours. We share a language of movement, and language described as kinetic empathy.

Over thousands of years, perhaps tens of thousands of years, the horse herds gradually merged with human societies. A shared language described by contemporary scientists as kinetic empathy, a language of movement, and similar compatible social structures facilitated the merging of the two species. The Mongol word for horse is takh, meaning spirit.

-Dr. Sid Gustafson, University of Guelph, equine veterinarian, veterinary behaviorist, and novelist.

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